TECHNOLOGY ISN’T JUST IN OUR DNA. IT DEFINES OUR MBA.

ONLINE MBA

Recognized as the No. 1 Online MBA in New Jersey by U.S. News & World Report in 2022.

ONLINE MBA OVERVIEW

The Online MBA at Stevens is an AACSB-accredited program that combines business knowledge with the technology and analytics that are necessary to excel in today’s data-centric world. Led by industry-leading faculty engaged with top-tier organizations, our part-time, online program offers tailored leadership development, individualized career services and two on-site immersions in the New York City region.

As an Online MBA student, you’ll build upon your foundational managerial toolkit with the following:

Analytical and quantitative tools to solve complex problems.

Enhanced data literacy and analytics skills to make fast, data-driven decisions.

Marketing, strategic and operations management skills that are central to every business unit in every industry.

Leadership and innovation development to better manage resources, inspire teams and foster growth.

QUICK FACTS

NEXT START DATE

January 23, 2023

OVERVIEW

  • 39-48 Credit Hours
  • 13-16 Courses
  • 8 Concentrations
  • 100% Online Courses
  • 2 Immersions in the NYC Region
  • 2.5-3 Years Completion Time*

*Total time to complete the program may vary based on the number of credits taken each semester.

ONLINE MBA CONCENTRATIONS

You’ll have the option to choose from the following eight in-demand concentrations:

Project Management

Sustainability Management

Finance

Financial Analytics

Financial Engineering

Information Systems

Network & Communication Management & Services

Business Intelligence & Analytics

100%

EMPLOYMENT

100% of MBA graduates in the Class of 2022 accepted job offers within three months of graduating.*

No. 14

FOR BEST VALUE

Stevens is ranked No. 14 among “Best Value Colleges” by PayScale’s College ROI Report (2022).**

No. 1

ONLINE MBA IN N.J.

Stevens’ Online MBA has been ranked No. 1 in New Jersey since 2015 (U.S. News & World Report, 2022).

No. 14

FOR ECONOMIC RETURN

Stevens ranked No. 14 among top business schools for economic return by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce (2022).**

No. 13

FOR BEST CAREER PLACEMENT

Ranked among the top private schools for best career placement by the Princeton Review (2022).**

*Based on data from 82% of the 2021-2022 full-time program graduates.

**Based on the cost of a four-year bachelor’s degree program.

COURSEWORK

The Stevens Online MBA curriculum is structured to ensure your studies are closely aligned to your professional aspirations. The coursework emphasizes collaboration through group projects and presentations and helps you develop your creativity and critical thinking skills. You’ll gain the knowledge and tools to speak the language of business, and leverage analytics and insights to improve decision making at technology-driven organizations across industries. 

PREREQUISITE COURSES

The three prerequisite courses provide students with a foundation in basic business skills to ensure their ability to meaningfully engage in high-level discussions with classmates. Students with relevant undergraduate coursework may be eligible to waive one or more of these courses.

This course covers the fundamental principles of finance. The primary concepts covered include the time value of money, principles of valuation and risk. Specific applications include the valuation of debt and equity securities as well as capital budgeting analysis, financial manager’s functions, liquidity vs. profitability, financial planning, capital budgeting, management of long term funds, money and capital markets, debt and equity, management of assets, cash and accounts receivable, inventory and fixed assets. Additional topics include derivative markets.

This course will develop accounting analysis useful for managerial decision-making purposes. Topics will include an introduction to elements of financial accounting, cost-profit-volume analysis, manufacturing costs and elements of cost accounting, special decision analysis, budgeting, variances, and controllability and responsibility accounting.

This course introduces managers to the essence of business economics — the theories, concepts and ideas that form the economist’s tool kit encompassing both the microeconomic and macroeconomic environments. Microeconomic topics include demand and supply, elasticity, consumer choice, production, cost, profit maximization, market structure, and game theory while the macroeconomic topics will be GDP, inflation, unemployment, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, fiscal and monetary policies. In addition, the basic concepts in international trade and finance will be discussed.

LANGUAGE OF BUSINESS

Courses in this block provide fundamental skills in marketing, operations management and strategy — three crucial areas that give students mastery of topics central to every business unit in every industry.

The study of marketing principles from the conceptual, analytical, and managerial points of view. Topics include: strategic planning, market segmentation, product life-cycle, new product development, advertising and selling, pricing, distribution, governmental, and other environmental influences as these factors relate to markets and the business structure.

This course covers the general area of management of operations, both manufacturing and non-manufacturing. The focus of the course is on productivity and total quality management. Topics include quality control and quality management, systems of inventory control, work and materials scheduling, and process management.

An interdisciplinary course which examines the elements of, and the framework for, developing and implementing organizational strategy and policy in competitive environments. The course analyzes management problems both from a technical-economic perspective and from a behavioral perspective. Topics treated include: assessment of organizational strengths and weaknesses, threats, and opportunities; sources of competitive advantage; organizational structure and strategic planning; and leadership, organizational development, and total quality management. The case method of instruction is used extensively in this course.

Leadership and Innovation

The three courses in this block will challenge you to think differently about leadership — how to manage resources, inspire teams and foster innovation. You’ll get a better sense of your personal leadership style while developing the confidence and capability needed to fearlessly attack missions and drive change.

Project success depends, largely, on the human side. Success in motivating project workers, organizing and leading project teams, communication and sharing information, and conflict resolution, are just a few areas that are critical for project success. However, being primarily technical people, many project managers tend to neglect these “soft” issues, assuming they are less important or that they should be addressed by direct functional managers. The purpose of this course is to increase awareness of project managers to the critical issues of managing people and to present some of the theories and practices of leading project workers and teams.

Executives make decisions every day in the face of uncertainty. The objective of this course is to help students understand how decisions are made, why they are often less than optimal, and how decision-making can be improved. This course will contrast how managers do make decisions with how they should make decisions, by thinking about how “rational” decision makers should act, by conducting in-class exercises and examining empirical evidence of how individuals do act (often erroneously) in managerial situations. The course will include statistical tools for decision-making, as well as treatment of the psychological factors involved in making decisions.

In this course, students will evaluate and create their own prospective business strategies. They will develop an understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation in starting and growing a business venture. Students will be given an opportunity to actually start their own business or create a business in their company by learning how to take advantage of the new order of business opportunities of the information age. This course’s main objective is to show students how to identify these opportunities, be able to formulate and evaluate both qualitatively and quantitatively whether the opportunity is worth pursuing, and, of course, how it may be pursued. Actual case studies and experiences will be intertwined with the course content.

Analytical Thinking

Courses in this block emphasize highly advanced analytics techniques that will teach you the ways successful managers look at and use data in understanding how markets work and making better recommendations to guide the enterprise.

This course explores data-driven methods that are used to analyze and solve complex business problems. Students will acquire analytical skills in building, applying and evaluating various models with hands-on computer applications. Topics include descriptive statistics, time-series analysis, regression models, decision analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and optimization models.

This course is intended to integrate all previously taken courses in the program by presenting a set of increasingly complex business problems. These problems can be solved through analytic skills taught in this course and previous courses. In particular, the course is intended to reinforce the understanding of analysis as a way to build models that can focus attention on parts of the system that can be improved through intervention. The early part of the course uses synthetic data and empirical data readily available for analysis. The second part of the course encourages students to state and solve their own problem, gathering their own data as a part of the analytic process.

Concentrations

The Stevens Online MBA curriculum includes four elective courses, giving you the flexibility to explore a discipline in depth or further round out your studies. You can choose to pursue one of the degree concentrations, each of which is aligned with a distinct area of need in industry, or take elective courses across the concentrations.

Finance

This course addresses the fundamentals of venture capital, which includes the venture capital industry, the structure of venture capital firms and venture capital investments. It addresses in some detail the relationship between venture risk and return, the cost of venture capital and the valuation of high growth companies. The course covers a variety of valuation methods as well as analysis of company capital structure or “cap tables.”Students use software tools to determine the value of stocks, options and special features of preferred stock. Topics related to the finance of innovation and the relationship between strategy and venture finance are also covered. Lessons learned are reinforced through case analyses and real examples from the industry.

This course takes a practical approach to managing investments. It covers a wide variety of investment vehicles ranging from pure equity and debt offerings to complex derivatives and options. Various investment strategies are presented, which focus on the different fundamental approaches and tactics used by leading investors to achieve their financial goals. The course also focuses on investment styles, including momentum, growth, income, asset allocation and vulture investing. Students participate in real-time simulation experiences to create viable portfolios of stocks, bonds and other investments, while tracking their performance against the overall market and the class on a weekly basis.

This course covers the fundamentals of financial derivatives, including the basic properties and the pricing of futures, options and swaps. It also explores trading and hedging strategies involving financial derivatives. Special topics, such as exotic options and credit derivatives, are explored. The course provides the foundation of financial derivatives and lays the ground for a rigorous risk management course and other advanced quantitative courses, such as stochastic finance.

Topics covered in this course include: leverage on the balance sheet and weighted average cost of capital; bankruptcy, turnarounds, and recapitalizations; international currency hedging; stock options; private equity valuation; mergers and acquisitions; and the issuance of public and private securities.

Financial Analytics

This course is designed to teach students the nature and availability of the financial data available at Stevens. The focus of the course will be on equity, futures, FX, options, swaps, CDSs, interest rate swaps, etc. They will learn how to use a Bloomberg terminal. As part of the course the students will be certified in the 4 areas that Bloomberg offers certification. We will cover the Thomson-Reuters Tick history data and basics of using this data. The course also introduces basics of applied statistics. Bloomberg terminal access will be required for any student taking the course on the web.

In this course, students will learn the basics of the open-source programming language R using financial data and applications. Basic statistical knowledge is required to complete the course. Upon completion, students will be able to use R for assignments and research using data in finance.

This course is a primer on Python (language syntax, data structures, basic data processing, Python functions, modules and classes). The remainder of the course covers open-source Python tools relevant to solving financial programming problems. There will be reading assignments of the corresponding chapters in the textbook and additional materials will be provided.

This course will provide an overview of issues and trends in data quality, data storage, data scrubbing, data flows and data encryption. Topics will include data abstractions and integration, enterprise-level data issues, data management issues with collection, warehousing, preprocessing, and querying. Furthermore, the Hadoop based programming framework for big data issues will be introduced along with any governance and policy issues. Corequisite: FE 513

Full Description

The course provides a practical introduction to SQL databases and Hadoop cluster systems. Students will receive hands-on instruction about setting up and working with databases. Most of the software will be introduced using case studies or demonstrations, followed by a lecture of related fundamental knowledge. The course covers SQL, NoSQL and database management systems. The course will cover accessing databases using API.

This course deals with financial technology underlying activities of markets, institutions and participants. The overriding purpose is to develop end-to-end business decision-making data analytics tools along with enterprise-level systems thinking. Statistical learning algorithms will be connected to financial objects identification and authentication along with the appropriate databases to create enterprise level financial services analytics systems.

Effective visualization of complex data allows for useful insights, more effective communication, and making decisions. This course investigates methods for visualizing financial datasets from a variety of perspectives in order to best identify the right tool for a given task. Students will use a number of tools to refine their data and create visualizations, including: R and associated visualization libraries, Ruby on Rails visualization tools, ManyEyes, HTML5 & CSS 3, D3.js and related javascript libraries, Google Chart Tools, Google Refine, and image-editing programs.

Financial Engineering

To complete this concentration, you will take either FE 543 or FE 610, as well as either FE 535 or FE 621.

This course introduces the stochastic calculus to students of finance and financial engineering. The course deals with Markov chains, Poisson processes, random walks, Brownian motion, asset prices as processes, limits of stochastic sequences, Ito sums and integral, fundamental models in modern finance, price dynamics and elementary examples of stochastic differential equations.

This course provides the mathematical foundation for understanding modern financial theory. It includes topics such as basic probability, random variables, discrete continuous distributions, random processes, Brownian motion, and an introduction to Ito’s calculus. Applications to financial instruments are discussed throughout the course.

This course deals with risk management concepts in financial systems. Topics include identifying sources of risk in financial systems, classification of events, probability of undesirable events, risk and uncertainty, risk in games and gambling, risk and insurance, hedging and the use of derivatives, the use of Bayesian analysis to process incomplete information, portfolio beta and diversification, active management of risk/return profile of financial enterprises, propagation of risk, and risk metrics.

This course provides computational tools used in industry by the modern financial analyst. The current financial models and algorithms are further studied and numerically analyzed using regression and time series analysis, decision methods, and simulation techniques. The results are applied to forecasting involving asset pricing, hedging, portfolio and risk assessment, some portfolio and risk management models, investment strategies, and other relevant financial problems. Emphasis will be placed on using modern software. Prerequisite: FE 543 or FE 610

This course introduces the modern portfolio theory and optimal portfolio selection using optimization techniques such as linear programming. Topics include contingent investment decisions, deferral options, combination options and mergers and acquisitions. The course introduces various concepts of financial risk measures.

This course deals with basic financial derivatives theory, arbitrage, hedging, and risk. The theory discusses Ito’s lemma, the diffusion equation and parabolic partial differential equations, and the Black-Scholes model and formulae. The course includes applications of asset price random walks, the log-normal distribution, and estimating volatility from historic data. Numerical techniques, such as finite difference and binomial methods, are used to value options for practical examples.

Information Systems

IT organizations must be able to leverage new technologies. This course focuses on how organizations can effectively and efficiently assess trends and emerging technologies in data and knowledge management, information networks, and analyzing and developing application systems. Students will learn how to help their organizations define, select, and adopt new information technologies.

This course focuses on the role of Information Technology (IT) in reengineering and enhancing key business processes. The implications for organizational structures and processes, as the result of increased opportunities to deploy information and streamline business systems, are covered.

This course leads students through the identification, analysis, definition, and deployment of service opportunities within public and private organizations. Each of these phases is analyzed in detail to encompass the principal activities, methods, tools and techniques applied in the respective phase. Students will learn how to identify appropriate supporting techniques and information technologies for the different phases of the service life cycle, assess the role of technology, and gauge the organizational impact of service-focused operations. The objective of the course is to enable students to identify, implement and evaluate innovative service offerings in their organization.

This course focuses on the issues surrounding the design of an overall Information Technology architecture. The traditional approach in organizations is to segment the problem into four areas: network, hardware, data, and applications. Instead, this course concentrates on the interdependencies among these architectures. In addition, this course will utilize management research on organizational integration and coordination. The student will learn how to design in the large, make appropriate choices about architecture in relationship to overall organization goals, understand the different mechanisms for coordination available, and create a process for establishing and maintaining an ongoing enterprise architecture.

Network & Communication Management & Services

This comprehensive course provides an introduction to voice and data networking. The course begins with an overview of sample wide-area and local-area network architectures and provides an introductory discussion on the role and importance of the TCP/IP protocol architecture. The relationship between bandwidth, passband, signaling rate, and data rate is then presented and examined. Different signaling techniques are compared, the operations of selected analog and digital modulation techniques are examined, and PCM and related techniques to digitally encode analog information are studied. We describe the operation of cyclic redundancy codes in error detection and discuss the importance of channel coding rate and coding gain in system operation. The function and service of data link protocols in network architecture is examined. Both frequency and time division multiplexing are described and their operation is compared. The course concludes with an examination of mobile wireless networks. Knowledge of fundamental algebraic problem solving is a must.

This comprehensive course examines LANs (both Ethernet and Wireless LANs), TCP/IP, routing protocols, congestion control techniques, internetwork operation and internet applications (including VoIP). Emphasis is placed on protocol and network architecture, protocol operation, advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and applications. Specific topics include LAN architecture and protocols, IP protocol architecture and addressing, TCP protocol operation, Internet routing, flow and congestion control, multicasting, Mobile IP, DHCP, and an introduction to SDN. Internet applications (email, DNS, http) and VoIP are also studied. This course also includes a virtual network simulator which provides valuable and practical examples to support and extend the concepts examined in the lectures. Prerequisite: TM 601

This course surveys the basic principles underpinning U.S. and international telecommunications policies, regulations and laws. In particular, we will examine the legal and regulatory treatment of a number of related technologies — from telephony to cable to the internet — whose convergence will continue to challenge established principles. The course will focus most intently on administrative policies as well as statutory and regulatory laws. In addition, the course will address the role played by antitrust, IP and constitutional law in shaping our nation’s telecommunications landscape. Finally, the course will consider the important role played by state and federal agencies — antitrust enforcers, state public utility commissions and the Federal Communications Commission — in developing and administering our nation’s telecommunications laws, regulations and policies.

Students also choose one of the following to complete this concentration.

This course provides a broad and comprehensive perspective of mobile wireless networks. Topics covered include fundamentals of mobile wireless networking, radio architecture, the multiple access techniques of TDMA, CDMA (with examples provided from UMTS and cdma2000), and OFDMA. The principle 4G standard, LTE, is also studied. The LTE access and core networks are examined and the important functional network elements are identified and distinguished. Key enabling technologies for 5G wireless networks are also identified and discussed. Emphasis is given to the role of software defined networks and network function virtualization in 5G (and 4G) networks. To assist in this discussion, an introduction to both SDN and NFV is provided. 5G mobile wireless networks are introduced and the architecture and challenges of emerging 5G networks are examined. The impact of the Cloud (or Centralized) RAN (C-RAN) in 4G and 5G networks is also studied.

This course provides a broad and comprehensive study of the technologies enabling broadband services and networking. High-speed network access technologies, core-network architectures, and the broadband service environment are the focus of this course. The broadband access technologies of DSL, cable modem service, optical fiber-based access, and the high-speed wireless technology of LTE and 5G are examined and differentiated. The core-network technologies of MPLS, RSVP and DiffServe, as well as the services-converging IP Multimedia Sub-system (IMS), are discussed and studied as enabling technologies for broadband services. An overview is provided of key broadband services: VoIP, IPTV and streaming video. The course concludes with a discussion of the opportunities and threats posed to service providers and the communications industry by the emerging disruptive technologies of broadband networking. Prerequisite: TM 610

This course examines two important new network technologies and architectures — software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). These two closely related approaches are a direct response to the changing requirements to support new networking services in an integrated and flexible approach. The reason for each architecture is presented and their ability to meet the changing network requirements is examined. The architecture, standards, and applications for each is presented and studied. Each architecture is differentiated and compared and the potential interworking of each is considered. The course concludes with an introduction and study of the internet of things (IoT) and cloud computing. The course is guided by both a required textbook and recently published scholarly papers on these topics. Prerequisites: TM 610

Project Management

This course deals with the basic problems of managing a project, defined as a temporary organization built for the purpose of achieving a specific objective. Both operational and conceptual issues will be considered. Operational issues include definition, planning, implementation, control, and evaluation of the project. Conceptual issues include project management vs. hierarchical management, matrix organization, project authority, motivation, and morale. Cases will be used to illustrate problems in project management and how to resolve them.

This course provides a theoretical perspective on project management for a better understanding of project implementation in modern organizations. The course is based on the premise that success in project leadership depends on a proper managerial style and attitude, and not on specific tools for planning and controlling. The course focuses on developing the manager’s conceptual thinking and on building “the project manager’s mind.” The course helps managers see the entire project landscape and the long-term issues that are critical to project success. It will also address the organizational aspects of initiating and running the program.

This course deals with advanced problems in project management that were not addressed in previous courses. It also expands on several previously mentioned topics. The course addresses the critical points in project management for the experienced project manager and looks at projects in their broad sense, as seen by top management and from an organizational global perspective.

This course focuses on key leadership skills for addressing the complex challenges posed by program management, highly-matrixed environments and cross-national collaborations Its purpose is to enhance individuals’ abilities to develop others, strategically integrate efforts across groups, and drive change. The concepts presented are theory and research driven so that participants can deepen their conceptual understanding. At the same time, the course calls upon learners to address real-life challenges they face as program and or director-level leaders. Each session presents effective techniques and uses experiential exercises or assignments to provide plenty of practice. The course also requires participants to further transfer learning to their workplaces through focused development planning and coaching support.

Sustainability Management

This course addresses environmental management and its role in sustainability from multiple perspectives, including but not limited to that of a natural scientist, an engineer, a marketing manager, an economist, an environmental lawyer, and a policy maker. The course also introduces students to some of the many tools used by environmental managers, such as life cycle analysis, environmental audit, etc. Students will learn from the course instructor and invited subject matter experts, who will explain in a non-technical manner that is intended for adequate comprehension by students from diverse fields of study on how their respective disciplines contribute to proper management of our environment, thereby making our world more sustainable.

This course will focus on best practices and emerging trends in sustainable business management. Topics will include corporate social responsibility, sustainable business theories, green business models, value chain management, green marketing, triple bottom line reporting, benefit-cost analysis and sustainability metrics and reporting. Students will explore the relationship between business management and sustainability goals for a number of industrial sectors. The course will include case studies as a tool for assessing strategies, identifying opportunities for improvements and recommending future actions. Students will be introduced to commonly used sustainability reporting frameworks and will use them to evaluate objective-setting and progress towards green goals.

A survey of legal and regulatory approaches to environmental protection. Topics include: environmental ethics, National Environmental Policy Act, State and Federal environmental agencies; and the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Superfund, Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, Right-to-Know, Environmental Cleanup Responsibility Act, and wetlands protection.

This course addresses issues of sustainable development at the local, regional and global scales. Topics include understanding of the definitions, history, current status and future outlook of sustainable development. Population dynamics, wealth distribution, principles of economic growth, social dimensions of sustainable growth (poverty, food security, health, education, social inclusion), biodiversity and ecosystem dynamics, climate change. Sustainable development stakeholders and their roles and responsibilities including individuals, advocacy groups, local, regional and country-level governing bodies, NGOs and corporations. Legal, policy and regulatory aspects of sustainable development. A systems view of sustainability and sustainable development including the concepts of global boundaries and resiliency.

Business Intelligence & Analytics

Covers marketing analytics techniques such as segmentation, positioning, and forecasting, which form the cornerstone of marketing strategy in industry. Students will work on cases and data from real companies, analyze the data, and learn to present their conclusions and make strategic recommendations.

Introduces the tactical and strategic issues surrounding the design and operation of supply chains, to develop supply chain analytical skills for solving real life problems. Topics covered include: supplier analytics, capacity planning, demand-supply matching, sales and operations planning, location analysis and network management, inventory management and sourcing.

This course focuses on network concepts, including graph-theoretic fundamentals, centrality, cohesion, affiliations, equivalence and roles, as well as design issues, including data sampling and hypothesis testing. Another focus of this course is on marketing applications of social network analysis — in particular, the use of knowledge about network properties and behavior, such as hubs and paths, the robustness of the network, and information cascades — to better broadcast products and search targets.

Theoretical and practical aspects of risk assessment and management will be covered. Major topics include: Importance of innovation and technological changes in current competitive environment, risk and uncertainty, decision trees, binomial methods and derivation of Black-Scholes option pricing formula, extension of option methodology to non-financial (real) options, VAR (value at risk), a framework of risk assessment, and several real-world case studies.

Immersion

Online MBA students will be required to participate in two immersions, 1.5 credits each. Immersions will take place over a weekend in the NYC region. Students will be responsible for arranging travel and accommodations.

CAREER OUTLOOK

Earning an Online MBA prepares you for career paths in management-level roles across industries. 

Prospective Occupations for Online MBA Graduates

Job Title
Employed
Median Annual Earnings
Job Title Marketing Manager
Employed 274,000
Median Annual Earnings $142,000
Job Title Financial Manager
Employed 672,000
Median Annual Earnings $134,000
Job Title Sales Manager
Employed 395,000
Median Annual Earnings $132,000
Job Title Human Resources Manager
Employed 154,000
Median Annual Earnings $121,000
Job Title General or Operations Manager
Employed 2,379,000
Median Annual Earnings $104,000

Source: Lightcast Labor Market Data, 2021. Numbers rounded to the nearest thousand.

STEVENS MBA ALUMNI HAVE GONE ON TO WORK WITH ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS:

DELOITTE CONSULTING

STANLEY BLACK & DECKER

PARAMOUNT

MERCK

JPMORGAN CHASE & CO

SAP LABS, LLC

PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS

Applicants must submit transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate institutions where credit was earned. You may submit unofficial transcripts during the application process. After admission, you will be required to submit official transcripts.

PROFESSIONAL Résumé

Work experience is not a requirement for the Online MBA program, but the admissions committee does value applicants with professional experience. You must include a résumé with your application that highlights:

  • Academic record.
  • Work and internship experience.
  • Leadership abilities.
  • Professional aspirations.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Your application must include two letters of recommendation. The strongest applications will include one letter from a current supervisor, and one from a former supervisor or previous employer who can speak to your leadership potential and discuss your professional performance.

GMAT/GRE

Scores are not required.

TUITION & COST*

$1,776

Per Credit

$60

Application Fee

Fee waivers available

$250

Enrollment Deposit

Financial Aid

*Tuition based on fall 2022 rates effective September 2022. Tuition and fees are subject to change annually. Additional program fees may apply.

Key Dates & Deadlines

Term
Early Submit
Priority Submit
Final Submit
Start of Classes
Spring 2023
October 10, 2022
$250 Deposit Waiver* and Application Fee Waiver Available.
November 21, 2022
Application Fee Waiver Available and Early Application Review.
December 21, 2022
January 23, 2023

*Applicants who apply by the early submit deadline and are admitted may be eligible for a $250 deposit waiver. Applicants who receive education assistance from employers or other tuition discounts are not eligible. Other eligibility conditions may apply.

UPCOMING WEBINARS

Attendees will receive an application fee waiver.

Check back soon for more upcoming events.

FACULTY

A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Pranav Garg

Pranav Garg, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Gary Lynn

Gary Lynn, Ph.D.

Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Peter Dominick

Peter Dominick, Ph.D.

Teaching Associate Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Bei Yan

Bei Yan, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Alkiviadis Vazacopoulos

Alkiviadis Vazacopoulos, Ph.D.

Teaching Associate Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Ann Murphy

Ann Murphy, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
A professional headshot of Stevens faculty member, Wei Zheng

Wei Zheng, Ph.D.

Associate Professor & Endowed Richard R. Roscitt Chair in Leadership

Request Information

By providing my information and clicking the request info button, I agree to be contacted via email, phone, or text to learn more about the program selected above. Since this program is 100% online, Stevens Institute of Technology does not offer US visas to attend.